Free Videos

Metals, money and the pub across the road

20 May 2022
I ask Nigel how a kid fresh out of high school scored a job in the open cry pit at the London Metals Exchange, how contract disputes used to be settled (hint, there was a lot less compliance paperwork) and the old-school method of settling contract disputes.

Which money is best? Free Banking money!

17 May 2022
Scottish pounds are much maligned in England. (And among mystified Australian customs officers, I can report.) But what if these funny looking scraps of paper, which claim to be equivalent to a Bank of England banknote, actually hold the secret to the best form of money of all?

Which money is best? Silver!

16 May 2022
They don’t call it a pound karat. It’s not the family gold you show off at dinner parties. The dollar is not called the doubloon. And the yuan isn’t called the Jīnzi.

Which money is best? Cryptocurrency!

12 May 2022
Whatever form of money might be best theoretically speaking, cryptocurrencies are the future and fiat is the past. That’s what Sam Volkering thinks. Here’s how he put it: “You need to get your head out of TradFi!”

Which money is best? CBDCs…?

11 May 2022
Well, we couldn’t find anyone to advocate for the idea that central bank digital currencies are the best form of money… but our gold expert, John Butler, just happens to be an expert on CBDCs too.

Which money is best? Tally Money!

10 May 2022
Welcome to another Fortune & Freedom video which asks the question: which money is best? This week’s guest doesn’t just have an opinion. He’s actually created the answer! And it’s called Tally Money.

Which money is best? Gold!

9 May 2022
Welcome to a new Fortune & Freedom video series which asks the question: which money is best?

Over the coming days… weeks… months, or possibly even years, we’re going to be inviting guests to come and make the case for why their favourite form of money is the best form.

How high can interest rates go before the crash?

29 April 2022
It’s reverse limbo at the Bank of England. How high can interest rates go before disaster strikes?

And will the Old Lady of Threadneedle Street, as the BoE is known, march them up to the top of the hill only to march them down again?