In today’s issue:

  • AI gets its vote
  • What’s inside your iPhone?
  • RoboElvis

Editor’s note: Today, we bring you a guest piece by Sam Volkering from his publication AI Collision which was first published on Tuesday 25 June.

You can hear from Sam more often at AI Collision and learn more about the latest developments in AI by simply clicking here to sign up for free on Substack.


Welcome to AI Collision 💥,

I haven’t seen a margin of victory like this since Middlesborough smacked eight past Manchester City in May 2008…

The coincidental nature of that is that I was funnily enough in Portugal (Lisbon) in 2008 in a bar watching that astonishing game and today I’m in Portugal (albeit the Algarve) witnessing a similar shellacking!

The margin of defeat I’m talking about today is the poll I submitted to you last week.

I think rather than explain, I’ll just show you the results…

You’ve not failed me before with your predictive polling, and I’m confident you aren’t failing me now.

Has there been a greater certainty in British politics in the last 100 years? I’d love to hear your thoughts if you can compare this to anything else you’ve seen over time.

Leave a comment.

Anyway, after about ten minutes trying to find it on the Labour Party website, clicking through seven different pages and then looping through three of the same things just to find the PDF version… I EVENTUALLY got the Labour manifesto the party calls “Change”.

Source: Labour.org.uk

I wanted the PDF version (as I did for the other major parties) so I could do this: “CMD+F” “Artificial Intelligence”.

That’s the search function (find) in a PDF to search for key terms. Good thing is in the Labour manifesto, artificial intelligence appears… once.

And here it is:

We will ensure our industrial strategy supports the development of the Artificial Intelligence (AI) sector, removes planning barriers to new datacentres. And we will create a National Data Library to bring together existing research programmes and help deliver data-driven public services, whilst maintaining strong safeguards and ensuring all of the public benefit.

The Conservatives’ manifesto was a little easier to find. I just needed to scroll down, and then down, and then down a bit further on the party’s site – which very much looks like it was a Year 6 graphic design contest – and “Download Manifesto” was there for me.


Source: conservatives.com

In terms of direct reference to AI, here’s what the party had to say:

Artificial intelligence (AI) will accelerate human progress in the 21st century, just as the steam engine and electricity did in the 19th century.

The UK is well positioned to spearhead this transformation and is already leading global work on AI safety.

It blends this in with some stuff about R&D and having turned the UK into a science and innovation “superpower” but that’s pretty much all it dedicates to AI.The document for Reform UK – which I’m adding here as it seems in terms of the popular vote that it is clearly the second biggest party now in the UK – was the easiest to find and was only available in PDF. The party calls it “Our contract with you”.

Source: reformparty.uk

And on AI it says this…

Oh. Reform UK doesn’t mention it at all. Bother.

Oh well, onto the Liberal Democrats.

Their manifesto was much easier to find as well. They call it, “For a fair deal”.

Source: libdems.org.uk

There was a little scrolling but it was easy to download and search. They at least mention AI, more than Reform UK, but not quite as much as the other two.

The Lib Dems say:

We will make the UK a world leader in ethical, inclusive new technology, including artificial intelligence, and a global centre for the development, manufacture and export of clean technologies.

That will do. There are other parties, but they are of little concern.

Now that all said (or not said in Reform UK’s case) I thought I’d take this information and ask AI what they made of it.

Here’s what I said to Copilot, Google’s Gemini and ChatGPT:

I’m going to give you three sections of text, I don’t want to say who they’re from. But solely based on what they say about artificial intelligence in these sections, can you select for me your favourite one and hypothetically suggest that if you had to vote for one, which one you’d vote for?

1. We will ensure our industrial strategy supports the development of the Artificial Intelligence (AI) sector, removes planning barriers to new datacentres. And we will create a National Data Library to bring together existing research programmes and help deliver data-driven public services, whilst maintaining strong safeguards and ensuring all of the public benefit

2. Artificial intelligence (AI) will accelerate human progress in the 21st century, just as the steam engine and electricity did in the 19th century. The UK is well positioned to spearhead this transformation and is already leading global work on AI safety.

3. Nothing.

4. We will make the UK a world leader in ethical, inclusive new technology, including artificial intelligence, and a global centre for the development, manufacture and export of clean technologies.

First off, Copilot.

Certainly! Let’s take a closer look at these sections:

The first section emphasizes supporting the AI sector, removing barriers to data centres, and creating a National Data Library. It aims to deliver data-driven public services while maintaining safeguards1.

The second section highlights AI’s potential to accelerate human progress, drawing parallels to historical technological advancements like the steam engine and electricity. It positions the UK as a leader in AI safety1.

The third section is succinct: “Nothing.”

The fourth section outlines a vision for the UK to lead in ethical, inclusive technology, including AI, and become a global hub for clean technology development and export1.

Given these options, I’d hypothetically vote for the second section. Its optimistic view of AI’s transformative impact aligns with my perspective. However, each section serves a unique purpose, and the choice ultimately depends on the context and goals of the discussion. 😊

Next up, Google’s Gemini.

If I had to vote based on these sections, I would choose option 1.

Here’s why:

Focus on development and infrastructure: This section talks about supporting the development of the AI sector,which suggests they understand the need to grow the industry. Additionally, removing planning barriers for data centers indicates a focus on building the infrastructure needed for AI to flourish.

Data utilization with safeguards: The creation of a National Data Library suggests they see the value in utilizing data for public services, but the mention of safeguards indicates an awareness of potential privacy and security concerns.

Public benefit focus: They emphasize that the benefits of AI should be accessible to all, suggesting a commitment to inclusive development.

While option 2 highlights the potential of AI and the UK’s role in safety, it doesn’t delve into specifics of development or public good. Option 4 mentions ethical AI but doesn’t elaborate on concrete plans. Option 3 simply offers no information on AI.

Therefore, based on the information provided, option 1 seems to have the most comprehensive approach, considering development, infrastructure, data utilization, safeguards, and public benefit.

And finally, ChatGPT.

Based on the provided sections, here’s a brief analysis of each one’s stance on artificial intelligence (AI):

### Section 1:

This section highlights:

– Development and support of the AI sector.

– Removal of planning barriers to facilitate the establishment of new datacentres.

– Creation of a National Data Library to integrate existing research and enhance data-driven public services.

– Commitment to maintaining strong safeguards and ensuring public benefit.

**Pros:**

– It outlines specific actions to support the AI industry (removing barriers for datacentres).

– Emphasizes the importance of data in advancing AI and public services.

– Includes a focus on maintaining public trust through strong safeguards.

**Cons:**

– The statement, while detailed in terms of infrastructure (datacentres, data library), is less inspiring or visionary compared to the other sections.

### Section 2:

This section emphasizes:

– AI as a transformative force, likened to the steam engine and electricity in their respective eras.

– The UK’s position as a leader in AI development and safety.

**Pros:**

– Provides a visionary outlook on the potential impact of AI.

– Positions the UK as a global leader in both AI innovation and safety, reflecting ambition and confidence.

**Cons:**

– Lacks specific details on how these goals will be achieved or supported.

### Section 4:

This section focuses on:

– Positioning the UK as a world leader in ethical and inclusive technology development, including AI.

– Promoting the UK as a hub for clean technology innovation and export.

**Pros:**

– Emphasizes ethical and inclusive approaches to technology.

– Encompasses a broader vision of leadership not just in AI, but in clean technologies as well.

– Aligns technological development with global sustainability goals.

**Cons:**

– The statement is somewhat general and does not delve into concrete steps for AI specifically.

Conclusion:

**Preferred Section:**

My preferred section is **Section 4**. It presents a comprehensive and forward-thinking vision. It balances the promotion of AI with ethical considerations and inclusivity, which is crucial in the current landscape where the implications of AI are under global scrutiny. Additionally, the alignment with clean technologies shows a commitment to sustainable progress, which is both timely and socially responsible.

**Hypothetical Vote:**

If I had to vote for one, I would choose **Section 4**. It offers a balanced approach that not only aims to position the UK as a leader in AI but also ensures that this leadership is grounded in ethical, inclusive, and sustainable practices.

I honestly had no idea what the outcome would be here.

But astonishingly, Copilot voted for the Tories, Gemini voted for Labour and ChatGPT voted for the Lib Dems!

You can see the reasoning as to why in each, they explain themselves quite well – ChatGPT probably goes overboard with it, but still, it’s at least detailed.

Maybe this is the state of the current voter too?

Confused, and on any given day, maybe swinging from one party to the next?

I don’t know, but if we’re basing the vote on manifesto detail on AI policy, then who bloody knows who’s going to win on 4 July!

AI gone wild 🤪

When you think of Apple, typically you think of its devices: the iPhone, MacBook, iMacs, iPads, Apple Watch, etc.

You don’t think of what’s inside – at least, most people don’t.

I do. And I’m fascinated by it. Not just Apple devices, but every device I have.

That’s why over time when eventually a device dies, I tear it apart, try to revive it, sometimes even just tinker around to see what’s really on the inside of these things.
Sometimes I can revive it like my 4th generation Apple iPod (with click wheel) that’s now 20 years old. Thanks to a larger battery and upgraded SSD I have it humming along nicely. Very retro of me.

But sometimes I can’t bring them back from the brink, like my Sony Xperia Z1 from around 2013. I believed it was waterproof… but a pool party in Las Vegas decided that wasn’t actually the case 😭.

Nonetheless, that Z1 got the full tear-down and I found all kinds of different components in it – different suppliers, different chips sets, definitely not all Sony.

And that’s because no device in the world is made up of parts from just one company.

Take a look at the following infographic I saw at the weekend.

Source: @mukund via X.com

This is what’s inside an iPhone. I count 12 different companies in there. All of them with a little piece of an iPhone jigsaw puzzle.

This is a great illustration of what I talk about when I say the AI revolution isn’t just about a small select group of big tech like Nvidia or Microsoft.

It’s about all the other pieces of the puzzle that go into making AI a reality.

Remember AI is no different to that image above. It’s all just hardware that’s really good at processing data and giving natural language responses.

Someone has to make that hardware, someone has to invent that hardware. Someone has to find the metals to make it, make and lay the cables to send it, create the radio chips, the wireless chips, the processing, the cooling… you get the idea.

So when you’re next looking at your phone or leaning on AI to help you out with something, look a little deeper and think what’s really in there. And if you’re so inclined, just rip it open and take a peek for yourself.

One last thing. This isn’t AI related as such. Actually, come to think of it, we did talk a bit about AI so maybe this is AI relevant…

Anyway, below is a crypto roundtable session I was invited onto last week with the folks over at Money Morning (US).

It was me, Chris Johnson (from Money Morning), James Altucher (Paradigm Press and here at Southbank with Altucher’s Investment Network UK) and Ian King (Banyan Hill Publishing) talking all things crypto.

If you’re interested in that and what we all had to say (including a snippet on AI) then check out the video here.

Boomers & Busters 💰

AI and AI-related stocks moving and shaking up the markets this week. (All performance data below over the rolling week). [Figures correct at time of writing.]

Boom 📈

  • Wearable Devices (NASDAQ:WLDS) up 16%
  • Bigtincan Holdings (ASX:BTH) up 10%
  • AMD (NASDAQ:AMD) up 4%

Bust 📉

  • Nvidia (NASDAQ:NVDA) down 10%
  • Taiwan Semi (NYSE:TSM) down 5%
  • Lantern Pharma (NASDAQ:LTRN) down 16%

From the hive mind 🧠

  • It’s hard enough for humans to figure out emotional intelligence. So I think the chances of an artificial intelligence figuring out emotional intelligence is even more remote. That won’t stop people trying though.
  • It wasn’t that long ago that 3D printing design changed the way in which fabrication of parts could be done. Now we can 3D print all kinds of metals and shapes with more efficiency and strength. Now sprinkle a little bit of AI into the mix and we might be on the verge of a new kind of industrial design renaissance era.
  • Hang on a sec, wasn’t it only about a week ago Apple announced that OpenAI would be integrating into its platform? Yeah it was. And now it’s also said to be talking with Meta!? Does Apple do anything for itself anymore? Or… did it ever do anything for itself?

Weirdest AI image of the day

Homeless robot Elvis impersonator – r/Weirddallee

ChatGPT’s random quote of the day

“Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.” – James Baldwin


Thanks for reading, see you next time!

Sam Volkering
Editor-in-Chief, AI Collision